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Napa Valley Wine

The 2001 BV Georges de Latour Private Reserve.

The term “cult cab” gained great currency in the late 1990s and early 2000s. It was really a California phenomenon, though certainly other regions have their iconic wines. The California cult wines were predominately Cabernet Sauvignon and mostly came from Napa. The cult wines were so-named because of a nearly fanatical group of wealthy collectors who would pay huge prices to obtain bottles in a cult-like devotion to a group of small, quality-focused wineries.

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Zuccardi Wines: Steeped in Tradition

Zuccardi Wines: Steeped in Tradition


Posted on Jul 29, 2020

Mendoza argentina wine

The private tasting room at Bodega Santa Julia

For almost 60 years the Zuccardi family has been making wine in Argentina’s Mendoza region. We visited one of their 3 wineries to hear their story first-hand, have a delicious traditional asado lunch and to taste their wines.

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Our latest Video AdVINEture features our very own ‘backyard’, British Columbia’s Okanagan Valley. We met with some old favourites like Meyer Family Vineyards, Painted Rock Estate Winery, and Okanagan Crush Pad, as well as two discoveries which have quickly become new favourites: Little Engine Wines and Kismet Winery. This is just a sneak peek of our recent trip, click on the individual links for the full story on each. Cheers!

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wine bottle and wine glass

Domaine Lafage Cuvée Centenaire on a sunny evening

Roussillon (pronounced “roo-see-yon”) is a wine growing region in the south of France that is often thought of as just part of the larger Languedoc-Roussillon, a region that stretches along the Mediterranean from the Rhone estuary to the Spanish border. But that perception is changing and today Roussillon is increasingly recognized as a region on its own, known for making a vast diversity of wine styles and for producing some great values.

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Pesquera Winery

Tempranillo Grapes at Pesquera

The natural wine movement has been around in various forms for over a century. At its core, natural wine proponents advocate making a wine with the least amount of human intervention possible. Wine will not just make itself; it requires at least some human intervention to plant the vineyard, pick the grapes and have them ferment. How much intervention beyond that is acceptable to the natural wine movement? Perhaps the biggest criticism of the movement has been that there has never been a single accepted definition or set of criteria that distinguishes a natural wine from one that is not. Until now.

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oliver bc wine

The stunning property at Kismet.

Regular readers of this blog will know that our focus is on interviewing winemakers to tell you the back story of how their particular wine got into the glass. With Kismet we broke with tradition and interviewed the growers instead of the winemaker.

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